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How an Award-Winning Data-Driven TV Strategy Drove Sales Success for Applegate

In recent years, the CPG industry has been met with a variety of challenges. From lingering supply chain issues to rising costs associated with inflation to competition among emerging brands, to changing consumer preferences.  

Recent research from McKinsey & Company indicated that several key trends are top of mind for consumers: 

  • 45% of consumers plan to find more ways to save money when shopping  
  • 29% of consumers will actively research the best promotions more frequently 
  • 40% of consumers plan to increase their focus on healthy eating and nutrition 

As a result of these industry-wide changes, CPG companies are seeking ways to stand out from the crowd and rethinking their marketing strategy to reach shoppers at critical points on the path to purchase. Among the innovative ways to reach shoppers, Connected TV (CTV) has emerged as an invaluable tool.  

Applegate’s Challenge 

Over the past two years, Applegate’s diverse range of products has steadily generated increased sales. For this campaign, Applegate was looking for a way to efficiently continue to acquire new buyers, bring back lapsed buyers, and defend loyal customers – all while driving cross-category purchases across their entire portfolio.

Goals  
• Increase customer acquisition  
• Boost customer loyalty  
• Lift sales and dollars spent per customer  
• Improve campaign efficiency

To boost sales, Applegate would need to find a creative way to reach and engage these customers. 

The Solution 

By partnering with Cadent and Catalina, Applegate was able to implement a targeted and cost-effective CTV campaign.  

The Plan 

Together, Cadent and Catalina developed a sequential messaging strategy to deliver household-level targeted CTV ads to 4.2MM existing and new shoppers. By monitoring consumption and purchase behavior in real time, they were able to activate a responsive marketing approach to promotions.  

Shoppers who were exposed to 3 CTV ads but did not make a purchase received an in-store offer to try the new Applegate product. On the other hand, shoppers who were exposed to the ads but did make a purchase did not receive the initial offer and were instead delivered a promotion to try other products, with the aim of expanding these customers’ share of wallet.  

The Results 

Through CTV ad impressions and in-store sequential offers, the campaign generated a significant return on ad spend (ROAS) and sales lift, as well as providing Applegate with powerful buyer insights.  

By The Numbers
• $2.13 Incremental ROAS 
• 24.9% Sales Lift42% Increase in Dollars Spent Per Transaction$250,000 in Savings through Targeted Promotions

This strategic activation drove a 24.9% lift in sales and a 42% increase in dollars spent by customers per shopping trip. The campaign also resulted in an impressive $250k in promotional savings.   

Recently, the campaign earned the 2022 AdExchanger Award for Best Data-Driven TV Campaign. 

Next Steps 

Want to learn more about how Cadent and Catalina partnered for Applegate’s CTV and responsive marketing campaign?  

3 Things You Must Know Before Investing in CTV Advertising

Connected TV viewership continues to grow, as does the number of subscription-based and ad-supported streaming services available to consumers. However, Connected TV (CTV) ad spending is still considerably less than that of linear TV. But let’s take a step back to better understand the full CTV advertising landscape.  

The State of Connected TV by the Numbers 

As of February 2022, Nielsen found that the average weekly time spent streaming video content hit 169.4 billion minutes, up 18% since 2021 – on top of the growth streaming had already experienced since spiking in 2020. By the end of 2021, CTV ad spend had also increased – 57% year-over-year, reaching $15.2 billion – and is projected to grow an additional 39% in 2022 to $21.2B, according to the IAB’s “2021 Video Ad Spend and 2022 Outlook” report.  

While the streaming wars remain tenuous, with changes in format – both Netflix and Disney+ are planning to launch ad-supported tiers, and subscription churn leaving subscription counts in flux, many advertisers are moving full stream ahead with investment in the channel.  

This shift in ad spend and viewership will continue to increase as the linear and digital TV ecosystems converge. In fact, eMarketer predicts that US linear TV ad spending (including addressable, programmatic, and upfront investments) will grow to $68.35 billion in 2022 but will then decline over the coming years. Ultimately, CTV’s appeal of growing viewership and improved measurement is too strong for advertisers to ignore.   

To help you determine how to incorporate this channel into your media mix, here are three things you must know before investing in CTV advertising.  

1. CTV offers advertisers a huge opportunity to reach consumers with advanced targeting 

Reach people where they are watching with a more granular approach to audience targeting. Fragmentation remains a pain point for many advertisers, so as consumers continue to spread their attention across an ever-growing number of screens, devices, and platforms, it’s time for advertisers to follow where the eyeballs lead. 

With a wide variety of data and audience targeting solutions, advertisers are faced with choice overload. Fortunately, Cadent Aperture Audience Data Marketplace seeks to minimize friction and enable advertisers to activate audience segments from their preferred third-party data providers.  

Learn more about our data partners. 

2. Ad fraud is cause for concern among CTV advertisers, but the risk can be mitigated 

U.S. advertisers are expected to lose $23 billion to fraud this year, based on forecasts from Juniper Research. And like all digital media, fraud exists in CTV. According to DoubleVerify, the number of fraud schemes spiked by over 70% year-over-year from 2020 to 2021.  

But just how prevalent is ad fraud on CTV? GroupM and iSpot.TV determined that there will be $1 billion in CTV ad waste this year. While these numbers are not exact, that amounts to roughly 4.3% of all ad fraud. Unfortunately, as CTV viewership grows, the advertising industry will need to be more vigilant in combatting ad fraud. 

As an advertiser, it is important to understand if and how your CTV media has been evaluated by key verification, viewability, attention and brand safety markers – not all CTV or platforms are created equally. Cadent integrates with leading third-party verification and viewability providers to help you effectively combat issues like fraud.  

3. Measurement for CTV provides advertisers with digital-level insights  

Measurement is often seen as the defining characteristic that sets CTV apart from other TV advertising channels. Yet over the course of the past year, debates around “multiple currencies” have dominated the industry dialogue as agencies and advertisers raise their concerns regarding industry standards and the challenges of interoperability. 

At Cadent, we not only minimize the impact of fraud from a delivery and viewability standpoint, but we take it a step further by tying CTV performance to real business outcomes. Through Aperture Platform, Cadent enables measurement from the leading third-party measurement providers to best support our customers.  

Today’s marketers also need solutions that allow you to match planning, delivery, and optimization to results on a campaign-by-campaign basis. Cadent Aperture Viewer Graph was created with this challenge in mind. Advertisers do not have a single need and measurement in a “black box” is as inefficient as no measurement at all. Through Aperture, Cadent seeks to foster a more open, effective TV advertising ecosystem.  

Interested in learning more about CTV advertising through Aperture Platform? 

3 Things We Learned at Adweek Convergent TV Summit

This year’s Adweek Convergent TV Summit East brought together some of the industry’s leading experts in media, brand marketing, data, and adtech to discuss the evolving TV marketplace. Each session provided a critical lens on how advertisers and publishers are approaching the convergence of linear and Connected TV (CTV), from fluidity to audience data to content. Many of the sessions aligned closely with Cadent’s point of view with respect to the needs of the buy and supply side in the shifting landscape. In case you missed it, we collected three key takeaways from the Convergent TV Summit, shared below:  

1. Cross-Screen TV is the New Normal 

The complexity of the TV ecosystem is growing as audiences continue to fragment across screens, devices, and platforms. At the same time, advertisers are faced with the challenge of reaching these increasingly fragmented audiences. So, what does this mean for TV advertising?  

“The future is a cross-screen world. No advertiser buys just one platform,” said Nick Troiano, CEO of Cadent. 

This “new normal” was emphasized by Jon Steinlauf, Chief U.S. Advertising Sales Officer for the recently merged Warner Bros. Discovery. “There are 42 million homes in America that don’t subscribe to cable, that’s really the frontier,” he said. “Really what the advertisers are asking for is get those 42 million homes, extend my reach, because those homes may not watch a ton of set-top box television.” 

As a result, fluidity is playing a critical role in the cross-screen transition. Advertisers can no longer rely on a single channel to reach a complete audience, nor can they use linear-only or CTV-only platforms to build a media plan. Campaigns that take a “fluid” approach require deep insight into both linear and CTV media. 

Cadent’s Jes Santoro, SVP, Advanced TV & Video shared, “We have to look at things collectively, not ‘versus’ right now. …almost 40% of the viewing of TV content is not in that packaged, linear TV model.” 

To achieve the right balance between reach and precision, advertisers will need to find platforms that bridge the gap across linear and CTV buying.  

2. Automation and Audience Data Will be Key to Improving Results 

Today’s advertisers are faced with a myriad of choices for every campaign – how much do I spend on QAM-delivered media compared to IP? How much reach over targeted? How much do I invest during the upfront as opposed to scatter? The only way you can efficiently support that many choices is through automation.  

Nick Troiano said he believes, “The TV world has to focus on automation. There’s a lot of separation between platforms, data vendors, and measurement reporters. I think the next 12 to 18 months will be about automation and it will be driven by the need to bring measurement and performance together.”  

As we enter the upfront season, publishers and partners that can deliver better automation and audience solutions are poised to come out on top.  

3. Multiple Measurement Currencies are Here to Stay  

At this year’s Convergent TV Summit, the topic of measurement was front and center. In fact, Diana Boyles, Vice President of Marketing at Angi may have said it best: “Cross-screen measurement is no longer a ‘nice to have’ – it’s a necessity.”  

Accordingly, multiple currencies will continue to exist for the foreseeable future – not because the industry has not yet evolved to a single standard, but because marketers do not have a single need.  

“Value is in the eye of the beholder. Value means different things to different marketers,” said Dani Benowitz, President, U.S. of MAGNA.  

To best serve advertisers, platforms will need to enable multiple measurement currencies for TV reporting.   

Interested in learning more about Cadent’s cross-screen TV advertising capabilities?  

TV Ad Tech 101: Let’s Learn About Campaign Objectives

This is Class 1 where we will learn about Campaign Objectives. To continue reading, check out the TV Ad Tech 101 page.

The TV landscape is complex and constantly evolving. From the days of only broadcast and cable to today’s variety of advanced TV offerings, it is a challenge to keep up with the latest terminology. With a growing interest in ways technology can bring brands and audiences closer together, media buyers are left to figure out how it all works. To help you navigate this complex ecosystem, we’ve broken out the core elements of the TV landscape into a six-part series we’re calling TV Ad Tech 101.


Campaign objectives are the goals you set before planning a campaign. You need to first decide on these objectives in order to determine the right audience for your brand and establish the KPIs you will use to measure your success in reaching that audience.

Establishing clear campaign objectives is critical for a successful campaign. How will you know if your ad drove the right results if you have nothing to measure it against? The strategy for your entire media plan will hinge upon the campaign objective, so it’s important to know who you’re targeting and why.

Types of Campaign Objectives

Age and gender are the most common demographic-based audience identifiers. These demographics can be used to segment your audience for national linear TV campaigns, which are measured in GRPs – the rate of exposure. While most commonly used in traditional linear, age- and gender-based audiences are available across all TV media types including advanced TV.

Additionally, there are addressable audience-based targeting solutions leveraging behavioral, purchase, intent, and other data sources that can be used within indexed, addressable STB, CTV and OTT. Unlike traditional linear TV, advanced TV can be measured in terms of a marketer’s business outcomes, such as conversion, acquisition, and revenue. To accomplish this, closed-loop measurement methodologies are used to determine the lift in the desired action by the exposed group (consumers who were shown the ad) versus the control group (consumers who didn’t see the ad).

Why It Matters

There are several ways to approach setting campaign objectives. This includes:

Brand Awareness
TV advertising is an effective medium if your campaign is trying to boost brand awareness. The leading consumer brands have become household names by creating a brand narrative and distinct voice, then consistently using that message over time. When a brand creates ad content that is authentic to their brand, this builds trust and generates stronger brand awareness. This is a tactic used by both lesser-known brands trying to boost awareness and brands that are household names that want to remain top of mind.

Direct Response

This form of advertising, sometimes referred to as DRTV, is used when a brand uses a call-to-action to ask consumers to call, click, or purchase at the end of their commercial. For example, if your brand’s product is sold at a specific retailer, you may ask viewers to visit that store to buy the item. This approach is most commonly used in informercials, but can also be applied to other styles of advertising – in fact, many newer direct-to-consumer brands have utilized DRTV for their ad campaigns.

New Product Launch

When a brand is launching a new product or service, they may want to use TV ads to make a splash. A well-timed, catchy, or unusual TV ad can help brands drive interest in new items by helping them to stand apart from the rest. Is the product something that hasn’t existed before? Or is it a new way of doing something that other brands offer? Leveraging TV advertising for a new product launch can be the platform that catapults that brand to success.

Competitive Conquest
Does your brand operate in a highly competitive or saturated market? Brands that operate in a competitive space will often use TV ads as a way to drive a share shift. What this means is that advertisers can implement a TV ad campaign meant to drive consumers away from competitors. Take paper towels – we’ve all seen ads that show how one brand’s paper towels are more absorbent than another. The intent is that consumers will take this information with them to the store and it will become a part of the decision-making process when evaluating options on the shelves.

Rebranding & Repositioning
Times change and so do brands. Whether a brand is changing their look and feel, updating their messaging, or carving out a new place in the market, TV ads can help spread the news. With TV ads, small rebrands can make a big impact, and big rebrands can go viral. Consider Old Spice grooming products. Old Spice was once an average CPG brand; however, a strategic TV ad campaign proved to be the perfect outlet for their innovative rebrand.

Be sure to come back next week for Class 2 of TV Ad Tech 101, where you’ll learn all about Premium Content.